Mathematics Packages Hotlist

Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) Mathematics Exemplar Packages

 Key Questions for consideration
Questions are scattered through this document. They are there to prompt your reflection and potentially provide us with feedback about the packages that we can use in commenting on them. If you have time, we would love to hear your ideas about the packages and especially the thoughts prompted by the questions as well as your own ideas as you look through the packages. Feel free to phone us and we will record your comments if that is the easiest way for you to work. Written comments are also welcome.
 
Michelle Williams        0414 813 491 learningfutures@ozemail.com.au
Paul Sutton                 0418 750 236 learningfutures@ozemail.com.au
 

Background

The TTF project operates across 38 universities aiming to enhance the purposeful use of ICT in learning. One component of this project is the development, trial and promotion of exemplar lesson plan packages for use by preservice teachers in each of the Australian Curriculum areas of English Maths Science and History.
This hot list is designed to provide university staff and preservice teachers a brief tour of the three Mathematics packages – Early Years, Years 5 to 8 and Years 9 and 10. They are called packages because each contains a fairly basic lesson plan – just enough to outline the learning intent – and a discussion of how the lesson exemplifies the TPACK model described below.
 

TPACK

You can read the description below or dance your way through this explanation:
 
or get the really simple version at:
 
 
 
The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) conceptual framework espoused by Mishra and Koehler (2006), underpins much of the work in the project. The TPACK framework “attempts to capture some of the essential qualities of teacher knowledge required for technology integration in teaching, while addressing the complex, multifaceted, and situated nature of this knowledge” (p.1). Specifically it: highlights the … relationships between three forms of knowledge: Pedagogical knowledge (PK), content knowledge (TK); and technological knowledge (TK). This framework is represented in Figure 1 at left.
Among the recommendations emerging from the literature on the TPACK framework is the restructuring of professional learning experiences for pre-service teachers so that teacher preparation programs have increased levels of technology integration in their academic programs with an emphasis on authentic problem solving and design-based projects (Girod, Bell & Mishra, 2007; Koehler & Mishra, 2009). The TPACK model requires teaching and learning about ICT integration to be embedded in curriculum methods and professional studies components of a teacher education program, and to build capacity in teacher educators to embed ICT perspectives in their daily work.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Accessing the packages

Because they contain video footage of students, the packages are protected by a logon system that should be accessible to all with a university email address. Click here to access the packages. You may be directed to a registration page. Once registered, you can log onto the packages site. Should you have difficulty registering, a help desk has been set up. Registration stores a cookie on your computer so you will not have to login again on that machine.
 

Package structure

It is suggested you explore one package in some detail then flick through the others. A quick tour of each is provided at the end of this document.
Each package has a similar structure with several generic elements (eg Digital Literacy, Hints and Tips etc) that are the same across all packages. Look for these in the menu on the left on any of the following pages. They are a good succinct summary of these aspects of internet use and are well worth a look. To guide your selection each package is given a star rating out of 5 stars.
 
 
The Introduction page for each sets the scene in the first 1-3 paragraphs. Choose a package to look at in depth and either work through the package in your own way or use the general guide that follows.
 
Note that the audience for the package is preservice teachers.
 
Use the links in the menu on the left of the web page to go back to the introduction. Use the NEXT button at the bottom of each screen to navigate through the package.
 
ACARA curriculum mapping describes the links the lesson aims to make with the Australian Curriculum. While you may skim the detail, look more carefully at the bottom of the page where there will be some general capabilities (eg problem solving, or ICT capabilities) listed. These are usually of interest. A potential student activity that could lead to better reflection on their own lesson plans, is to ask how well this lesson sequence actually matches the ACARA curriculum.
 
 
AITSL mapping links the lesson to National Teacher Graduate Standards. Since these are relatively new and will not be applied until 2013 when National Teacher Registration is planned to start, these packages may be a useful way to introduce current 1st 2nd and 3rd year preservice teachers to the standards they may have to meet to get registered. It is not yet clear how national registration will work.
 
Lesson Plans include important information about the objectives of the lesson that may have been better included in the actual lesson plan. Links to the Australian Curriculum and other information are provided here.
 
The software guide is specific to each package and outlines the software used including useful descriptions of a range of software that could be used for this learning.
 
The Cyber Safety, Digital Literacy and Hints and Tips pages have an excellent summary of good advice for working online with students. These are “not to be missed” pages.
 
 
Continue to work through the remainder of the packages. Each page is unique to the package and there are no more generic pages.
To fully understand the TPACK model, it is desirable to read the pages describing Pedagogy/Technology etc intersections.
How might teachers use the TPACK model? Can it be used to create lesson plans? Is it best used to review lesson plans? What other uses do you see?
 
 

 

 

Quick Tours

Early Years – skip counting

 
Introduction The first paragraph describes the intent of the package while the rest alerts preservice teachers about what to look for in the package.
 
Lesson plans It is enough to look at the Lesson Objective for each of the 3 lessons (scroll through the page) though the Questions for preservice Teachers (PST) may be of interest. These are reasonably generic across the packages for the first lesson but become package specific for later lessons.
 
Lesson 1 Structure A very brief summary of the lesson structure that needs to be read after the reading the Lesson Objective seen above. (Note this site opens OK in Firefox but not in Safari on some occasions – all other pages work.)

 

 
Video 1 Click on the video to load it then click on the new screen to play the video. You will understand the lesson plan from the video. Think about the many different ways you could use this little video. Eg Suppose the little boy at the front was ADHD. How might that change the lesson?
 
TPACK nexus This brief description captures the intersection of Content, Pedagogy and Technology knowledges for this lesson. To see more detail, click on the links on the menu.
 
Video 2 The lesson continues. Would you do it this way? Is this video a discussion starter or an exemplar? How might you use it with preservice teachers?
 
Video 3 The final lesson.
 
Teacher reflection Things for the preservice teacher to look for in the video. Use the NEXT button to navigate to the video. This page reminds us that the audience for these packages is the preservice teacher. Consider the advantages and disadvantages of using this package and its accompanying discussion with preservice teachers. Would you use the package as is? Would you use parts of it for other purposes.
 

Middle years – proportional thinking

 
Introduction  The first paragraph describes the intent of the package while the rest alerts preservice teachers about what to look for in the package.
 
Lesson Plans It is enough to look at the Lesson Objective for each of the 3 lessons (scroll through the page) though the Questions for preservice Teachers (PST) may be of interest. These are reasonably generic across the packages for the first lesson but become package specific for later lessons.
 
Video 1 Click on the video to load it then click on the new screen to play the video. You will understand the lesson plan from the video. Think about the many different ways you could use this little video. Eg Suppose the little boy at the front was ADHD. How might that change the lesson?
 
TPACK nexus This brief description captures the intersection of Content, Pedagogy and Technology knowledges for this lesson. To see more detail, click on the links on the menu.
 
Further Professional Learning Worth a quick look – especially the fractions and Proportional reasoning references at the bottom of the page.
 
Video 2 The lesson continues. Would you do it this way? Is this video a discussion starter or an exemplar? How might you use it with preservice teachers?
 
Design a School learning object There are no links to the recommended learning objects in the package probably because they are in secured sites in some states. This link takes you to a version found via a Google search. WARNING: There are a lot of problems with this learning object and it is not recommended as an “exemplar” It may have use as something for preservice teachers to critique so they make good choices of learning objects in their career.
 
Video 3 The final lesson where students look at data from other schools. What discussion of proportionality is evident in this video?   
 

Years 9 and 10 bivariate Data exploration

 
Introduction  The first 2 paragraphs describes the intent of the package while the rest alerts preservice teachers about what to look for in the package.
 
Lesson Plans It is enough to look at the Lesson Objective for each of the 3 lessons (scroll through the page) though the Questions for preservice Teachers (PST) may be of interest. These are reasonably generic across the packages for the first lesson but become package specific for later lessons.
 
The Software Guide is worth a look. There are some powerful tools listed on this page. Save the link to Gapminder until you have taken the quick tour then have a good play.
 
Video 1 Click on the video to load it then click on the new screen to play the video. You will understand the lesson plan from the 2 videos. Think about the many different ways you could use these little videos. Eg Suppose one or more students was ADHD. How might that change the lesson?
 
TPACK nexus This brief description captures the intersection of Content, Pedagogy and Technology knowledges for this lesson. To see more detail, click on the links on the menu.
 
Video 2 The lesson continues. Would you do it this way? Is this video a discussion starter or an exemplar? How might you use it with preservice teachers? What is the advantage of using TinkerPlots rather than Excel? Could you make this work with Excel?
 
TPACK nexus a brief but good exploration of how the TPACK elements enhance learning when working together.
 
Further Professional Learning considers alternatives to TinkerPlots
 
Video 3 The final lesson where students look at Gapminder. This is a very powerful data analysis package.
 
TPACK nexus clearly demonstrated the integral nature of this learning.
 
For a powerful TED talk about Gapminder go to the inventor and be blown away.
 
For a similarly powerful experience from the Science 9/10 package and access to some wonderful learning objects, have a quick look at the 9/10 Science package introduction then take a wild ride in the Skate Park simulation.